Don’t cry over … an empty milk container

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Me and the kids

Here’s some milk, mommy … I bought it,

my 10-year-old said as he handed me a container of milk bought at the gas station.

The look on his face almost broke my heart.  I know he’s 10 (actually almost 11) and growing up very quickly.  He only calls me mommy when he’s upset.  He’s grown up in many ways,  but he will always be my baby, just as much as my daughter who is approaching 20.

Sometimes the simple actions of a child who has not yet really had to “face the world” can teach us so much.  Such a small gesture – stopping with his dad on the way to school to buy me some milk; but it taught me, actually reminded me of a lot.  As you see, I have already learned and apparently forgotten this lesson.  I just needed a review.

I shouldn’t let problems at home, fights with my husband, money issues and such be visible to my children. Period. Never!  As a parent, I have been trusted with these two wonderful treasures and it is my job to make sure they grow up happy, healthy and as equipped as I can possibly make them to face the world.  I failed that morning.  I think our roles were slightly reversed.

I was stressed over lack of time, lack of money and plethora of other things.  I was making my breakfast/lunch to take to work and we were out of milk.  I made some offhanded, grumpy comment to the effect of  “I don’t know how I’ll continue to keep food on the table at this rate.”  There’s some truth to that, but we aren’t destitute.  I can buy milk.  However, my son took those comments to heart.  He wanted to help in his own way and make his mom happy.  So, he took his own money earned from watching the neighbor’s dog and asked his dad to stop to buy me milk.  It not only made my day, but taught me a lesson.

It should not be my child’s responsibility to worry about what’s wrong at home.  I should also not cry over an empty milk container.

So, now as I continue this journey I started with last week’s blog, I will add remembering to always remain positive in front of my son to my bucket list of things I want to accomplish.

Until next time ….

Coming tommorrow:  A’Tempting’ Tuesday — My attempt at a new recipe each week.

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Thoughts to ponder….

I was just thinking today ….

With the economy the way it is these days and the day-to-day struggles of just getting by, it is very easy to get caught up in the “why me’s?”  and quickly throw a huge pity party.

The rising costs of fuel and food are taking its toll on everyone.  My husband and I feel it.  We feel the struggle more than we ever have.

I work in the nonprofit world with families of very low income.  Any issue I’m feeling affects them tenfold.  I’m learning very quickly not to focus on the pay that I don’t get, and focus on what my job does give me.

What does it give me?  It gives me the chance to use my skills and go home at the end of the day feeling like I’ve done something important.  It definitely gives me a great appreciation for what I do have.  And if the stories of the families we work with don’t do it, then one quick peruse through the newspaper or a quick listen to the morning news surely will.

Not to sound cliché, but I think I may be finally learning to “not sweat the small stuff” and really focus on what I HAVE and what’s important.

What do I have?

  1. I have a home … it’s not just a roof over my head, it is a home.
  2. I have a husband who provides for his family and comes home every night.
  3. I have a best friend.
  4. I have a little boy who still tells me he loves me every morning.  In fact, this morning he loved me “a lot, a lot, a lot.”
  5. I have a teenage daughter who trusts me enough to come to me when she has a problem, even when her teenage hormones are telling her I’m a freak of nature.
  6. I have an education.
  7. I’m alive.
  8. I have a God and the freedom to worship him.
  9. I have a car to put that expensive gas in and a job to drive it to.
  10. I have a kitchen and the ability to cook the food we constantly gripe about the cost of.
  11. I have luxuries that 100% of the families I work with do not have.
  12. I’m healthy.
  13. I’ve made mistakes and have been able to learn from them.
  14. I’m finally gaining the maturity to appreciate numbers 1 though 13.

I could sit here and continue this list all night long.  It’s amazing how many things to be thankful for you can come up with if you only take the time to try.  The list could go on and on.  What do I have to gripe about?

Enough mushiness for now. Night!